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From Palliative Care Australia Palliative Matters Stories about living, dying and Palliative Care

Patients

  1. National art competition highlights what matters most during the holiday season

    6 December 2018

    In the lead up to this holiday season, Palliative Care Australia (PCA) hosted the third Dying to Talk online art competition which asked participants to create a piece of art that demonstrates what matters most to them during the holiday season.  With a record of 125 entries submitted, artworks were created by artists all around the country.

  2. The woman turning children’s disabilities into super powers

    17 October 2018

    “Disability is not a deficit within the person, but shows up the deficits in our culture and society that does not fully accept, encourage and celebrate humanity, no matter what it looks like. The unique and distinctive abilities of this amazing group of children can act as an inspiration for all of us, to encourage each other.”

  3. Bear Cottage was our lifeline

    13 October 2018

    When Max was diagnosed with Batten Disease, we had no idea what his future held. All we knew was that our little boy was going to die.

  4. The strength of community

    12 September 2018

    We sometimes find ourselves on a long and difficult journey. Whether we are a patient, carer, family member or friend, illness takes a toll on everyone involved. Often people reach out to help us but often we don’t accept support, even when we need it. To help change this situation, Andrea Grindrod from La Trobe University is encouraging families and the community to work together.

  5. 17 year old student undertakes research to understand the Australian palliative care system

    30 August 2018

    Nearly every day we are confronted with death. We experience it personally, hear about it on the news, watch it in the movies and read about it in books and yet still, talking about death and dying with our loved ones remains a taboo subject. Conversely for 17 year old school student, Jemma Schusterbauer, personal experiences has made her eager to learn more about the end-of-life and understand the palliative care sector – an area she once found very confronting.

  6. Lucinda Barry is Dying to Talk during DonateLife Week

    1 August 2018

    For many people in palliative care, tissue and organ donation (e.g. corneal donation) is still a possibility and should be discussed as part of end-of-life conversations. Chief Executive Officer of Organ and Tissue Authority, Lucinda Barry, took some time this week to speak with Palliative Matters to discuss some of her end-of-life wishes using the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter.

  7. Memories are timeless treasures of the heart

    25 July 2018

    I witnessed an inspiring and heartfelt moment as day resident, Larry Andrews, walked into the community hall at Villaggio Sant’ Antonio aged care facility and was hailed by friends, family, former work colleagues and other fellow residents. There was a standing ovation as Larry entered and made his way to the front of the room in awe of all the people that had come to see him.

  8. Why Opioid Medicines are Important for Improving Quality of Life in Palliative Care

    18 July 2018

    With more understanding of how to manage pain using opioid medicines, the palliative care community can set an example for the rest of Australia to follow. Opioid medicines will always carry a risk of side effects and other issues – but by using a balanced approach, we can choose to manage that risk carefully, holistically, and with greater compassion.

  9. Sarah Richards of Marrawuy Journeys is Dying to Talk

    11 July 2018

    This NAIDOC week, Sarah answers questions from the Dying to Talk Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Discussion Starter which aims to assist Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to start thinking about what would happen if they were so sick that someone else had to make decisions for them.

  10. Last Wishes – The Afterlife Organiser

    2 July 2018

    Last Wishes, founded and created by Felicity Wegemund, was released earlier this year as an afterlife organiser for individuals to record their end-of-life and after death wishes all in one place. The mobile application can store information to help loved ones make decisions on an individual’s behalf by recording wishes for possessions, preferred funeral arrangements, documentations and any other desired requests.


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