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From Palliative Care Australia Palliative Matters Stories about living, dying and Palliative Care

  1. Winning haiku shines with wisdom, reflecting value in volunteering

    9 June 2017

    The death of his grandfather and a decline in his grandmother’s health inspired 22-year-old student, Joel Raymond, to learn more about death and dying and its impact on other families. Through volunteer work, he has contributed to many patients and families receiving palliative care, gaining insights that shine in his winning poem, crafted for a competition during National Palliative Care Week.

  2. Mobile hairdressers, cleaners and counsellors: website offers practical gifts for the bereaved

    8 June 2017

    Thousands of dollars worth of flowers were delivered to Kim Oakhill’s friends when their three-year-old daughter died. An allergy in the family meant that the flowers were relegated to the garage, where they made a mess and died. Watching on, Kim found herself wishing the flower money had provided something more practical to support the family, which inspired a great idea.

  3. Volunteer who sings from the heart rewarded with valuable life lessons

    5 June 2017

    Having served as a palliative care volunteer for 20 years, maybe it’s not surprising that Doreen Robinson thinks constantly – but not morbidly – of death.

  4. Book review – A Matter of Life and Death: 60 voices share their wisdom

    30 May 2017

    ‘A Matter of Life and Death: 60 voices share their wisdom’ is a compilation of reflections and narratives by people from various countries and backgrounds sharing their wisdom and perspectives on death. Yet as the title suggests, the reflections are as much about life, as death.

  5. Art competition to focus on connection with community

    27 May 2017

    “Just do it.” That is Ashley Fiona’s advice to any artist who is tempted to enter Palliative Care Australia’s online art competition, launched today. Ashley, who won the People’s Choice award last year, says she is “stoked and very honoured” to have been selected as a judge, along with last year’s overall winner, Anzara Clark, and artist Margaret Ambridge.

  6. Ten questions help consumers compare how residential aged care services provide palliative care

    25 May 2017

    People looking at aged care options are being encouraged to ask services whether they provide a palliative approach to care and whether they have links with specialist palliative care services.

  7. Consensus on principles for palliative and end-of-life care in residential aged care

    24 May 2017

    New guiding principles on the delivery of palliative and end-of-life care services in residential aged care have been agreed by six influential peak bodies. The principles reflect the need to recognise when an aged-care resident is approaching the end of life, in order to ensure their physical, emotional and spiritual needs are assessed and met.

  8. National health statistics highlight inequitable access to palliative care

    24 May 2017

    Where people live and their socioeconomic status has significant bearing on whether they need to rely on hospitals to receive palliative care, or are able to access it within the community, new national statistics suggest.

  9. Find it hard to express end-of-life wishes? Try new online activities, designed to help

    23 May 2017

    People wishing to document and share their wishes for end-of-life care can now complete a series of questions online, or play an online card game to inspire and capture their thinking. Federal Minister for Health, Greg Hunt, launched the new interactive online resources today, which build on Palliative Care Australia’s Dying to Talk Discussion Starter.

  10. Sue Pieters-Hawke shares how residential aged care enhanced Hazel’s quality of life and death

    23 May 2017

    Today, on the four-year anniversary of Hazel Hawke’s death, her daughter Sue Pieters-Hawke fondly remembers their final weeks together. Sue remains grateful that Hazel died in a residential aged care facility that understood dementia and provided good palliative care, both for her mother and those who loved her.

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