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From Palliative Care Australia Palliative Matters Stories about living, dying and Palliative Care

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  1. Royal Flying Doctor Service is dying to talk in the bush and map gaps in palliative care services

    20 October 2017

    Royal Flying Doctor Service doctors, nurses and pilots are embarking on a new Dying to Talk in the Bush project to support people living in rural and remote areas to discuss their end-of-life wishes and map gaps in palliative care access.

  2. Royal Flying Doctor Service highlights sorry state of palliative care access in remote areas

    20 October 2017

    “Not everyone is lucky enough to live somewhere, where – by good fortune – a palliative care expert has decided to locate themselves”. Read the full speech given by Royal Flying Doctor Service CEO, Martin Laverty, at the launch of the Dying to Talk in the Bush project.

  3. India’s father of palliative care gently shakes Australia with his insights and wisdom

    13 October 2017

    The man the New York Times describes as “the father of palliative care in India”, Dr MR Rajagopal, has arrived in Australia on a national speaking tour. He is attending screenings of a documentary about his work; Hippocratic – 18 Experiments in Gently Shaking the World.

  4. Bereaved volunteers support others experiencing grief through new national support line

    11 October 2017

    The Compassionate Friends has launched a new national support line for people grieving the death of a loved one, giving them the opportunity to speak with someone who can genuinely relate. The trained volunteers manning the free-call number are all bereaved parents, siblings or grandparents.

  5. Man on a mission to reduce unnecessary suffering

    5 October 2017

    Dr MR Rajagopal has successfully fought draconian laws in order to prevent large numbers of people suffering from severe pain. The Indian doctor is an outspoken critic of the modern medical industry and an inspiring global health leader. His story is told through an uplifting Australian documentary that premieres next week; ‘Hippocratic – 18 experiments in gently shaking the world’.

  6. Kelly Arthurs is dying to talk

    5 October 2017

    Sydney-based HammondCare clinical nurse consultant, Kelly Arthurs, provides palliative care education in residential care settings. She answers questions from the Dying to Talk Discussion Starter.

  7. Michelle Hooke is dying to talk using the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Discussion Starter

    18 September 2017

    Michelle Hooke is an Aboriginal woman who, as a registered nurse, has specialised in palliative care since 2002. She has worked as a palliative care nurse consultant and nurse unit manager in inpatient, community and acute settings. Michelle answers questions from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Discussion Starter.

  8. Dress made of tea bags wins Palliative Care Australia art competition

    30 August 2017

    A dress crafted from tea bags used by grieving families has been judged the overall winner of Palliative Care Australia’s art prize, announced today. The work, titled ‘Dying For A Cuppa’ was made by Karen Benjamin who works at a funeral home, where she makes a lot of cups of tea for people who are planning a funeral or grieving the death of a loved one.

  9. Personalised bears made from a loved one’s jeans are always ready for a cuddle

    17 August 2017

    Vickie Hartland experienced an intense period of grief about 10 years ago, with the death of seven family members over just two years. That is what has inspired her to make personalised bears from jeans that were once worn by people who are now sadly missed.

  10. Talking about your life can help the process of accepting death

    16 August 2017

    Dignity Therapy can bring great relief to people who are dying, but it often takes 20 hours to interview, transcribe, edit, review and present one person’s story. Russell Armstrong recognised that the therapy would be cost-prohibitive in Australia without volunteers, so he established a free award-winning service.


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