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From Palliative Care Australia Palliative Matters Stories about living, dying and Palliative Care

Volunteers

  1. Personalised bears made from a loved one’s jeans are always ready for a cuddle

    17 August 2017

    Vickie Hartland experienced an intense period of grief about 10 years ago, with the death of seven family members over just two years. That is what has inspired her to make personalised bears from jeans that were once worn by people who are now sadly missed.

  2. Talking about your life can help the process of accepting death

    16 August 2017

    Dignity Therapy can bring great relief to people who are dying, but it often takes 20 hours to interview, transcribe, edit, review and present one person’s story. Russell Armstrong recognised that the therapy would be cost-prohibitive in Australia without volunteers, so he established a free award-winning service.

  3. Rebecca Wessels is dying to talk using the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Discussion Starter

    15 August 2017

    Rebecca Wessels is the first person to answer questions from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Discussion Starter for Palliative Matters. She has a passion for preserving the language and culture of her Peramangk and Ngarrindjeri Aboriginal heritage.

  4. Cast your vote to help determine worthy winner of online art competition

    10 August 2017

    Voting has opened to determine which of 46 artists will win this year’s People’s Choice award in Palliative Care Australia’s online art competition.

  5. Caring for my beautiful husband as he died and through the days that followed

    10 July 2017

    Who is the best person to care for someone who has died? Sometimes, a person who loved them when they were living. Dr Fiona Reid shares her experience caring for her husband Morgan throughout his illness and in the days after his death.

  6. To focus on the needs of others brings great pleasure and relief

    28 June 2017

    Having spent 11 years working as a volunteer for Calvary Health Care Bethlehem, Robin Downs is very clear about who benefits most from her unpaid work. The 76-year-old, who wears bright colours and a cheery demeanour when visiting patients, tried to move away from Melbourne a few years ago. She missed her volunteer work so much that she came back.

  7. Life after a big loss: school or prison? Meet grief therapist Liese Groot-Alberts

    27 June 2017

    Liese Groot-Alberts is a keynote speaker at this year’s Australian Palliative Care Conference in Adelaide. She became a therapist after the sudden death of her young daughter. While working with internationally renowned psychiatrist, Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, Liese learned that after a big loss, you can decide to make life a school or a prison.

  8. Living with dementia: carers’ experiences in their own words

    22 June 2017

    “After about two years of inconclusive tests, finally, I was told by a specialist in Sydney that [my husband] had dementia. He said the sooner I accepted the fact the better, that acceptance was a journey, but he didn’t really tell me what dementia is; just that I had to accept it.”

  9. Artistic merit only part of the picture: judge looking for heart and soul

    13 June 2017

    As one of the three judges determining the overall winner of Palliative Care Australia’s art competition this year, Anzara Clark is looking for more than technical brilliance, inspired composition and colour mastery.

  10. Winning haiku shines with wisdom, reflecting value in volunteering

    9 June 2017

    The death of his grandfather and a decline in his grandmother’s health inspired 22-year-old student, Joel Raymond, to learn more about death and dying and its impact on other families. Through volunteer work, he has contributed to many patients and families receiving palliative care, gaining insights that shine in his winning poem, crafted for a competition during National Palliative Care Week.


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